Economic Contribution of Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys/Key West: Updates for Years 1996-97 and 1997-98

Economic Contribution of Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys/Key West: Updates for Years 1996-97 and 1997-98

Primary Country: United States
Ecosystem: coral reef
Sample Value Estimates:
Economic impact of recreational spending in Monroe County in 1996-1997
  1. $1.2 billion: visitor spending
  2. $1.4 billion: impact in terms of output / sales
  3. $507.9 million: resulting income and in 1997-1998
  4. $1.4 billion: $565.3 million: visitor spending
  5. $1.55 billion: impact in terms of output / sales
  6. 565.3 million: resulting income.
Methodology: IMPLAN input-output model
Region: Americas / Pacific
Data source: NOAA's Coral Reef Valuation Database

Publication information

Leeworthy, V. Vanasse, P. “Economic Contribution of Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys/Key West: Updates for Years 1996-97 and 1997-98” National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Ocean Service (NOS), 1999

Addtional Notes

In 1996-97, 2.65 million visitors spent 13.3 million person-days in the Florida Keys. This impact accounted for 59% output/sales, 44% of income, and 34% of the employment in Monroe County. In 1997-98, 2.92 million recreating visitors spent 14.3 million person-days in Monroe County, which accounted for 65%, 47% and 36% respectively. Report

Leeworthy, V. R.//Vanasse, P.

6/1999

Economic Contribution of Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys/Key West: Updates for Years 1996-97 and 1997-98

Silver Spring, MD: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Special Projects Office.pp. 1-20

economic impact/economic contribution/sales/output/income/employment/visitors/tourists/recreation

This report is part of the project "Linking the Economy and the Environment of the Florida Keys/Florida Bay" and part of the Socioeconomic Monitoring Program for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. The report updates estimates of economic impact/contribution (sales/output, income and employment) associated with visitor recreation uses of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Updates were done for years June 1996 - May 1997 and June 1997 - May 1998. Measurements udpated included measures of visitation (person-trips) and use (person-days) and economic contribution (sales/output, income and employment). No new surveys were conducted. Instead, the report compiled updated data on auto traffic on U.S. 1, air enplanement data from the Marathon and Key West airports and cruise ship passengers from the City of Key West. The methods used in the 1995-96 study of visitors as reported in "Technical Appendix: Sampling Methodologies and Estimation Methods Applied to the Florida Keys/Key West Visitor Surveys" (Leeworthy, December 1996) were used with the updated data to derive visitation and use estimates. Expenditure profiles from the 1995-96 study (English et al, November 1996) in this database were updated for inflation and lodging and food costs using the Monroe County Tourist Development Council's surveys of visitors and the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Workers 1982-84=100. The same model used by English et al, November 1996 was applied to the updated visitor estimates and spending profiles to derive estimates of visitor spending in Monroe County and the corresponding impacts on total output/sales, income and employment in Monroe County. In 1996-97, 2.65 million recreationg visitors spent 13.3 million person-days in the Florida Keys. These visitors spent $1.24 billion in Monroe County, which had an impact of $1.39 billion in output/sales, $507.88 million in income and 17,069 jobs. This impact accounted for 59 percent of output/sales, 44 percent of income, and approxiamtely 34 percent of the employment in Monroe County. In 1997-98, 2.92 million recreating visitors spent 14.3 million person-days in Monroe County. These visitors spent $1.38 billion in Monroe County, which had a total impact of $1.55 billion in output/sales, $565.29 in income, and almost 19,000 full and part-time jobs. This impact accounted for over 65 percent o output/sales, 47 percent of income and over 36 percent of the employment in Monroe County. Study found a significant shift in the proportional composition of visitors as compared with the 1995-96 baseline. There was a significant increase in crusie ship visitors in 1996-97 and 1997-98 and a decline in auto and air visitors in 1997-98. In 1997-98, there was an increase in auto visitors to levels above 1995-96, but a further decline in air visitors. Since cruise ship visitors are only day visitors and they generally don't participate in any natural resource based recreation, the higher proportion of cruise ship visitors was interpreted as a movement away from sustainable tourism.

Update of visitors and economic impact (sales/output, income and employment) in the Florida Keys. Part of the Socioeconomic Monitroing Program for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

Monroe County, Florida (Florida Keys). Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

All habitats in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

All recreation activities in the Florida Keys

Auto traffic on U.S. 1 from the Florida Department of Transportation. Air enplanement data from the Marathon and Key West airports. Cruise ship passenger data from the City of Key West. Expenditure updates for food and lodging from the Monroe County Tourist Development Council.

June 1996 - May 1997 and June 1997 - May 1998

In 1996-97, 2.65 million recreationg visitors spent 13.3 million person-days in the Florida Keys. These visitors spent $1.24 billion in Monroe County, which had an impact of $1.39 billion in output/sales, $507.88 million in income and 17,069 jobs. This impact accounted for 59 percent of output/sales, 44 percent of income, and approxiamtely 34 percent of the employment in Monroe County. In 1997-98, 2.92 million recreating visitors spent 14.3 million person-days in Monroe County. These visitors spent $1.38 billion in Monroe County, which had a total impact of $1.55 billion in output/sales, $565.29 in income, and almost 19,000 full and part-time jobs. This impact accounted for over 65 percent o output/sales, 47 percent of income and over 36 percent of the employment in Monroe County.Existing information from government data sources and reports.

Use methods employed in 1995-96 study as reported in "Technical Appendix: Sampling Methodologies and Estimation Methods Applied to the Florida Keys/Key West Visitor Surveys (Leeworthy, December 1996) for estimating person-trips and person-days. Expenditure profiles and economic impact model from English et al, November 1996. Both of these reports can be found at http://www-orca.nos.noaa.gov/projects/econkeys/econkeys.html.

0Bob Leeworthy

Information provided when available, for more information please visit the original database or PDF.