Dollar Values and Trends of Major Direct Uses of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

Dollar Values and Trends of Major Direct Uses of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

Primary Country: Australia
Ecosystem: coral reef
Sample Value Estimates:
Gross financial value of commercial tourism at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in 1995-1996 from
  1. $167.4 million: reef trips
  2. $236.3 million: mainland accommodation
  3. $243.3 million: island resorts
  4. $647 million: in total;
  5. $912.5 million: Total gross financial value of direct uses of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in 1995; Gross financial value of fishing at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in 1995 from
  6. $143 million: commercial fishing
  7. $122.5 million: from recreational anglers
Methodology: expenditure data
Region: Australia / Northeastern
Data source: NOAA's Coral Reef Valuation Database

Publication information

Drimil, S. “Dollar Values and Trends of Major Direct Uses of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park” Townsville, Queensland: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, 1999

Addtional Notes

Information from the NOAA Coral Reef Valuation Database: A total of 1.2 million visitor nights, Government Research Report

Drimil, S.

1999

Dollar Values and Trends of Major Direct Uses of the Great Barrier Reef Marine ParkResearch Publication No. 56Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Townsville, QLDtourism, gross revenue, Great Barrier Reef

This report presents estimates of the gross financial values of the major direct uses of the Great Barriet Reef Marine Park: commercial tourism, commercial fishing, and recreational fishing and boating. Overall, the total gross financial value of these three direct uses of the park in 1995 was $912.5 million. Funding levels for park management are less than 1% of the total gross revenue generated by the park. Gross financial value of commercial tourism 1995-1996: Reef trips $167.4 million

Mainland accomodation: $236.3 million

Island resorts, $243.3 million

TOTAL = $647 million for a total of 1.2 million visitor nights. Gross financial value of commerical fishing: $143 million. Gross expenditures by recreational anglers in 1995 = $122.5 million. Total gross financial value of the three direct useds fo the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in 1995 is $912.5 million.

Estimating the gross financial values of the major direct uses of a protected area provide policy makers with a clear understanding of the most dominant economic activities in the region. While gross values themselves are not an indication of the most profitable economic activities, they are an indication of those sectors that are financially most active. By estimating the the gross financial values generated by a protected area may help policy makers assess if investments in protection and management of the natural resource is commensurate with the level of financial services generated from the resource.

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Australia

Coral Reef

Commercial tourism, ommercial fishing, and recreational fishing and boating.

Expenditures on mainland accomodation (Queensland Tourist and Travel Corporation, 1996)

Passenger days on commercial vessels (Great Barriet Reef Maine Park Authority,1993-95)

Visitor nights spent on Great Barriet reef island resorts and expenditure by resort visitors (Austrailian Bureau of Statistics/Queensland Tourist and Travel Corporation, various years). Gross financial value of commerical fishing (Queensland Fisheries Management Authority, 1996). Recreational fishing estimates (Blamey and Hundloe, 1993).

1995-1996 (1996 dollars)

Gross financial value of commercial tourism 1995-1996: Reef trips $167.4 million

Mainland accomodation: $236.3 million

Island resorts, $243.3 million

TOTAL = $647 million for a total of 1.2 million visitor nights. Gross financial value of commerical fishing: $143 million. Gross expenditures by recreational anglers in 1995 = $122.5 million. Total gross financial value of the three direct useds fo the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in 1995 is $912.5 million.Government visitation and fish harvest reports.0Toben E. Galvin

Information provided when available, for more information please visit the original database or PDF.