Social and Economic Impacts of Marine Protected Areas: A Study and Analysis of Selected Cases in the Caribbean

Social and Economic Impacts of Marine Protected Areas: A Study and Analysis of Selected Cases in the Caribbean

Primary Country: Multiple
Ecosystem: marine park
Sample Value Estimates:
(a) For the Wreck of the Rhone Marine Park in the British Virgin Islands [WRMP], 41% of visitors would not be willing to pay more over present expenses and airfare before deciding not to come, 26% would be willing to pay 10% more, 23% would be WTP 20% more, 9% would be WTP 30% more, and 1% would be WTP 50% more and over (b) for the Saba Marine Park in the Netherlands Antilles [SMP], data wasn't available (c) for the Reserve Ilets Pegion in Guadeloupe, 43% would not be WTP more, 31.8% would be WTP 10% more, 15.0% would be WTP 20% more, 1.9% would be WTP 30% more, and 2.8% would be WTP 50% more and over (d) for the Soufriere Marine Management Area in St. Lucia [SMMA], 46.8% would not be WTP more, 31.9% would be WTP 10% more, 13.8% would be WTP 20% more, 4.3% would be WTP 30% more, and 3.2% would be WTP 50% more and over
Methodology: approach was to prepare five case studies of established MPAs, employing surveys, field observations, and the gathering and analysis of social and economic data
Region: Americas and Europe

Publication information

van’t Hof, T. “Social and Economic Impacts of Marine Protected Areas: A Study and Analysis of Selected Cases in the Caribbean” CANARI technical Report No. 252. 31pp., 1998

Addtional Notes

Conclusions of Study: 

  1. There is a direct correlation between local support for marine protected areas and perceptions of benefits to the local community. 

  2. In areas where tourism is a viable economic sector, marine protected areas in the Caribbean are capable of generating adequate income to be fully self-supporting at reasonably high levels of management. 

  3. Visitors value marine protected areas highly enough to be willing to pay more for the experience. 

  4. There is a strong relationship between the quality and features of marine protected areas and a rewarding visitor experience, which can be exploited more effectively in marketing, promotion, and public relations. 

  5. Employment and income opportunities provided by marine protected areas have tended to fall disproportionately to non-local businesses and individuals. 

  6. The benefits of protected areas over the long term are dependent on sound management of both the area itself and its surroundings. 

  7. There exists some tension between government decision-makers and tourism interests, which tend to seek ever higher numbers of visitors, and MPA management agencies, which are concerned with carrying capacity and resource conservation. 

  8. Marine protected areas benefit from high levels of stakeholder and decision-maker involvement It helps to reduce user group conflicts, results in more effective and relevant management decisions, and strengthens linkages with larger development policies. 

  9. Caribbean marine protected areas can and do serve as global models. This attracts valuable research, serves as a useful public relations tool, and brings prestige to the countries and the region.

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Information provided when available, for more information please visit the original database or PDF.