Managing small-scale fisheries in the Caribbean: the surface longline fishery in Gouyave, Grenada

Managing small-scale fisheries in the Caribbean: the surface longline fishery in Gouyave, Grenada

Primary Country: Grenada
Ecosystem: species
Sample Value Estimates: Income varied by boat type, combination of gear use, role in the fishery, and more importantly a fisher’s skill at catching fish. The data revealed the income of boat owners/captains on canoes and launcher longline boats was significantly higher than that on pirogues. Although the incomes of boat owners/captains were higher, they were responsible for all maintenance costs to boats, engines, and equipment; although, operational expenses were shared with crew members. In many of the cases documented, boat owners were in debt due mainly to high investment costs.
Region: Americas and Europe

Publication information

Grant, S. “Managing small-scale fisheries in the Caribbean: the surface longline fishery in Gouyave, Grenada” PhD Dissertation, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba. 270pp., 2006

Addtional Notes

 

Key finding 1: Sustainable livelihoods mean different things to different communities. In the case of Gouyave, the fishery sector is the major sector that provides livelihood security for individuals, households, and community even though the number of fishers is small compared to the overall community. 

Key finding 2: Fishers have extensive ecological and technological knowledge regarding the longline fishery that can provide useful qualitative data for fisheries assessment and planning. 

Key finding 3: It is important to recognize the need to incorporate resilience-enhancing strategies in all aspects of fisheries management and planning. 

Key finding 4: The management of large pelagic stocks involves coordinating vertical links (local, national, regional, and international levels) and horizontal ones (institutions/organization within levels). 

Key finding 5: The Management Objective Driven (MOD) approach (with modifications) is a promising alternative to managing small-scale fisheries in the Caribbean. 

Key finding 6: There are advantages to the use of interdisciplinary research tools and techniques in future Caribbean fisheries management. 

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