Cyanide Fishing on Indonesian Coral Reefs for the Live Food Fish Market - What Is the Problem?

Cyanide Fishing on Indonesian Coral Reefs for the Live Food Fish Market - What Is the Problem?

Primary Country: Indonesia
Ecosystem: coral reef
Sample Value Estimates:
Loss of coral cover in Indonesia due to cyanide fisheries was estimated using 3 different methods of measuring fish caught per km^2 per year: (a) .047% reef degradation using potential production and yield of groupers (b) .052% based on fishing effort and catch per unit effort (c) .060% using the volume of the trade in live reef food fish (d) 3.75% is the loss of live coral cover per year due to blast fishing.
Methodology: The estimate of reef area destroyed per fish caught was multiplied by the number of fish caught per km^2, per year, which was derived via 3 different methods of estimation.
Region: Asia

Publication information

Mous, P. Pet-Soede, L.Erdmann, M.Cesar, H.Sadovy, Y.Pet, J.S. “Cyanide Fishing on Indonesian Coral Reefs for the Live Food Fish Market - What Is the Problem?” n: H.S.J. Cesar (ed). Collected Essays on the Economics of Coral Reefs. CORDIO, Kalmar University, Sweden. p. 69-76, 2000

Addtional Notes

The cyanide fishery for food fish may not be as threatening to Indonesia's coral reefs as is sometimes assumed, especially not as compared to other threats such as blast fishing or coral bleaching caused by global climate change. The depletion of grouper stocks by the trade in live reef food fish, however, is worrying in both fisheries and conservation perspectives. Strategies to abate the depletion of these grouper stocks should consider cyanide fishing as well as other fishing methods.

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