Changing Reef Values: An Inquiry into the Use, Management and Governances of Reef Resources in Island Communities of the Maldives

Changing Reef Values: An Inquiry into the Use, Management and Governances of Reef Resources in Island Communities of the Maldives

Primary Country: Maldives
Ecosystem: coral reef
Sample Value Estimates: In-depth research was done on five islands in the Maldives: Kendhoo, Dharavandhoo, Thakandhoo, Makunudhoo and Hulhudhoo. This study was a qualitative assessment of the local communities' value of sand, coral and fish in the lagoons of Maldive. Sand and coral had a low level of use for traditional purposes and then changed to a high level of use for construction of dwellings and communal infrastructure. The effects of erosion from the increased use meant all communities began to value the protection provided by the sand and coral. Values towards fish in the island lagoon are multiple and are always changing, i.e. initially valued for subsistence, they are now mainly regarded for their value in recreational use and market exchanges.
Methodology: a qualitative approach through interviews and ethnographic research
Region: Asia
Data source: University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

Publication information

Mohamed, M. [Initial. Lastname] (J. Doe) “Changing Reef Values: An Inquiry into the Use, Management and Governances of Reef Resources in Island Communities of the Maldives” Thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Environmental Science, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, 260 pp., 2012

Addtional Notes

Author believes that the local level is the most important point of view to understand when addressing global environmental issues. The communities researched had long standing local rules to ensure the continued stay of scads in the island lagoon. The inititative shown by Kendhoo and Hulhudhoo in banning the use of coral and sand respectively demonstrated that for both communities the protection that the resources provided to the island was valued over their use value. The author contends that much improvement in integrating the economical and ecological can be seen in the advancement of areas such as environmental valuation, however, this advancement needs to go beyond this to include the social as well.

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